SOCIAL ANXIETY DISORDER

woman and train

Social anxiety disorder is a common type of anxiety disorder; research suggests about 7 percent of Americans are affected. A person with social anxiety disorder feels symptoms of anxiety or fear in certain or all social situations, such as meeting new people, dating, being on a job interview, answering a question in class, or having to talk to a cashier in a store. Doing everyday things in front of people—such as eating or drinking in front of others or using a public restroom—also causes anxiety or fear. The person is afraid that he or she will be humiliated, judged, and rejected. The fear that people with social anxiety disorder have in social situations is so strong that they feel it is beyond their ability to control. As a result, it gets in the way of going to work, attending school, or doing everyday things. Sometimes, they end up staying away from places or events where they think they might have to do something that will embarrass them.

What are symptoms of social anxiety disorder?

When having to perform in front of or be around others, people with social anxiety disorder tend to:

  • Blush, sweat, tremble, feel a rapid heart rate, or feel their “mind going blank”
  • Feel nauseous or sick to their stomach
  • Show a rigid body posture, make little eye contact, or speak with an overly soft voice
  • Find it scary and difficult to be with other people, especially those they don’t already know, and have a hard time talking to them even though they wish they could
  • Be very self-conscious in front of other people and feel embarrassed and awkward
  • Be very afraid that other people will judge them
  • Stay away from places where there are other people

How is social anxiety disorder treated?

Without treatment, social anxiety disorder can last for many years or a lifetime and prevent a person from reaching his or her full potential. Treatment often includes psychotherapy, medication, or both. It is important to first talk to your doctor about your symptoms. An exam and review of your health history can help to make sure that an unrelated physical problem is not causing your symptoms.

Please remember this information is intended for educational purposes only and should not substitute medical advice from a healthcare provider.